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matters. that was back in 1960 when richard nixon and jfk. >> i think mr. nixon is an effective leader of his party. i would hope he would grant me the same. the question is which point of view, and which party do we want to lead the united states. >> mr. nixon would you like to comment on that statement? >> i have no comment. >> cenk: the people who listened on the radio thought nixon had one, but the people watching it on tv thought kennedy won. it appeared that the debate swung the election in favor of kennedy. ever since then, people have put a tremendous amount of weight on the debates. because of that everybody plays the expectations game. what is funny here is all of the republicans are saying oh my god, obama is going to win. >> mitt romney has the advantage because he has been through 20 of these debates. >> mitt romney is a business guy, and hasn't had a debate against a democrat in overten years. >> mitt romney is just in practice. >> having been through this much more recently than president obama, i think he starts with an advantage. >> i think barack obama w
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
. >> oops. >> forgetting is bad, and looking bad is bad. in the very first tv debate, richard nixon refused to put on makeup. it hurt him. nixon later said -- >> more important than what you say is how you look on television. >> so campaigns obsess over details. when ronald reagan debated walter mondale, rollins and beckel were the opposing campaign managers. >> do you remember how high the podiums would be? >> days. >> we had days negotiating. >> the color of the room. >> what difference would it make to the candidate what color the room was? >> because in certain conditions, certain colors work for certain candidates. >> because mondale was shorter than reagan -- >> we wanted more distance between the two podiums. we debated between 7 1/2 feet and 9 feet for a day and a half. >> the first debate came, and reagan struggled. >> 2/3 of the defense budget pays for pay and salary -- or pay and passengers. >> he looked tired and ragged. the general observation was they just spent too much time with a 70-year-old guy trying to beat every factoid into his brain. >> people said ronald reagan is t
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
of republican candidates have done over -- going all the way back to richard nixon. that is, use code words, code issues, and try to use trade as a lever. it's obviously not working in ohio where his support is going down. one thing that i have to say for them at this point is the low expectations going into the debate actually help them. because i think the press would kind of like to give them another run or another chance to go around the track. so if he does decently in the debate, he'll get that chance but i agree with krystal. he would have to win that debate. >> in a way that he's not capable of, frankly. >> is he too elitist that he just can't connect? >> frankly, he he doesn't have the goods. this is not like he's a new candidate. he's been running for president for six years. he's had ample opportunity to connect with people, to introduce himself, and he's failed to do it for these six years. i don't see how these debates are going to make a difference. >> bob shrum, krystal ball, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >>> coming up, when republicans get desperate, they la
have some video to show you of a richard nixon appearing clammy and tired next to a tanned and rested, youthful and fabulous jfk, jr.. this is all relately started to, be more about appearance and, then, actual substance, right? who do you think will prevail, ed? >> i think they both have pretty good style or substance. i don't think either one whip open enough big enough gap. melissa: style, mitt romney, with would be the problem if it came down to style? what would you worry about? >> mitt needs to make it a debate about substance. my worry could be he could get bogged down in details of that substance. if he can't hold the president accountable for how you close 900 dal billion of spending or tax increases, he can not win the debate with enough of a margin to matter. to do that successfully on tv i think is very difficult. melissa: paul, what do you think? >> well i think there is a second element of intrigue here and that is how you're responding as the camera is on you when your opponent is saying bad things about you. melissa: that's a good point. >> all of these clips for the p
debates. john kennedy and richard nixon how nixon loft because he didn't wear make up and looked like he didn't shave. they thought he was dark and smarmy. turns out they were right, he was. >> whether was the al gore sigh, over and over again. [ sighs ] >> exactly. before that debate, al gore was five points ahead of george burke, after the sigh, he stalled out and george bush still lost that election, but he closed in close enough for the supreme court to make the call at home plate. but, my favorite, the absolute best debate moment of all lloyd benson, 1988 versus dan quayle. >> i have as much experience in the congress as jack kennedy did when he got the presidency. >> senator i served with jack kennedy. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. [ cheers and applause ] >> that was really uncalled for senator. >> you're the one that was making the comparison, senator. >> oh, smack! >> i love that! >> and there's one more. let's keep them on a high note. there's one more not from a general election debate but from a primary just last year
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
september leads can evaporate by election day. hubert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. nixon won by less than 1%. jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll and narrowly lost. the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a regan landslide. >> with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others is that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times particularly from news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the convention. the loss to bush by 7%. a former are clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2
say that it deserves. let's go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i'm going to be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people dead because of this and there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. megyn: this this story potentially at that level? >> i don't know that it would reach that level. but i can tell you it's enough concern that democrats in the united states senate. and i know some democrats in the united states house are very concerned and i believe senator kerry said i want to learn more about this. what did you know and when did you not. there are questions not just coming from republican partisans. these are people who care about americans around the world and our national security policy. megyn: they sent that joint letter yesterday and the return date on the information requested is november 13, which is conspicuously after the presidential election. but they want answers both democrats and republicans as to what went on here. thanks so muc
of nixon's supporters in 1960 were so impressed with this young jack kennedy that they said he didn't sweat. seems pretty cool. seems ok and lot of people had problems with george bush but against john kerry they thought he seems arrogant and frankenstein, i will go to george bush. they can change your established based too and if the other guy does such a great job it could also galvanize his base at the expense of the other guy's base. all stuff we don't know and won't know until election. [talking over each other] neil: bring weapons and kevin thought i should keep that to myself. or something. another ball and chain kind of thing. the next that idea. [talking over each other] dagen: i won't even let you do that. connell: stay here all day if you one. tomorrow night -- dagen: put you to sleep. connell: i am used to it. goes in one year. [talking over each other] connell: special coverage starts at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night. [talking over each other] connell: department of defense telling lockheed martin not to be concerned about the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. rich edson at th
with nixon it was about how he sweated. with george bush it was about looking at his watch. it's about someone's eye contact with the camera. but what this really still has to come down to is reminding voters what we're facing. and if we continue to import oil, and fund opec and send our soldiers to defend opec oil fields and lose our blood and treasure there, that's a concern. if we talk about the problems with china and the manipulating their currency and that affecting our manufacturing, that's a concern. it's about the cost of health care rising, about government's role in health care, those are concerns. and whoever looks nice in these things or talks nice doesn't matter so much as what the substance and the takeaway is. because the next morning people are still going to be concerned around their kitchen table, what affects american families. are their kids going to have a future? do they have jobs? is their economy growing -- >> i get that. but also, as you know, the whole point of televised debate, there is a measure of how did you look? how did you seem? did you seem presidenti
that first televised debate when americans saw kennedy and nixon on t.v. the second was the year 2000 when george bush overtook vice president al gore. as john mentioned earlier in the show that does not mean it is time to get complacent. one thing romney could have going for him is that the jobs report is out just 36 hours after the first debate. more john fugelsang coming up on the full court press and we're always live in chat, join us there, current.com/billpress. you're about to watch an ad message created by a current tv viewer for capella university. matter. i've been a nurse since 1979. i love being a nurse. a few years ago a friend i went to grade school with showed me a book she had kept from third grade. i had written that i wanted to be a nurse. after being a nurse for about twenty years i decided that i need to further my education. my masters degree was done completely online and that gave me the freedom and ability to do my education while i raised my kids and worked full time. raising my kids as a single mom and having them see me get my education online and work opportunit
political era for getting people like joe mccarthy and richard nixon. talk about the media establishment's view of eisenhower. >> the media establishment basically loved eisenhower. he was their friend. you read his private correspondence. he and the publisher of "time" were great buddies. a lot of time people working in the white house -- it was such a different age. it was not as adversarial. it was much more trusting. correspondents would come out over to the white house, have a few drinks a s with ike. he'd say stuff off the record. he even talked about recognizing china. imagine if that had leaked during the 1950s. it was just a different era. and ike was trustworthy. reporters also trusted him. >> also talk about ike the republican president that was willing to send troops to little rock. >> you know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federa
, and as a student of history, this campaign is a lot like the 1960 race between kennedy and nixon. it is like the campaigns in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year v
the romney campaign is going, you have to hear the clock ticking, right? >> nixon was thrown out of office after he won reelection. >> stephanie: right. >> and here we have forgery -- >> stephanie: oh right. [overlapping speakers] >> stephanie: let me finish. let me finish. [ laughter ] >> i'm letting you finish. >> stephanie: thank you. see, we're proving that we -- in honor of rodney king we're all getting along. you have hearings in missouri and indiana >> this week i just came back and i didn't sleep for about four nights. >> stephanie: does that affect your keen legal reasoning? >> and the fact that people are calling me harassing me. >> stephanie: on behalf of the "stephanie miller show," stop calling and harassing her. >> the judge said i need to serve mr. obama, mr. [ inaudible ], michael [ inaudible ] who is the commissioner of social security register of hawaii within 30 days. the other side will get to respond -- >> stephanie: so even if he gets reelected, you are going to keep going? >> there are five or six lawsuits that are going on. we're trying to have t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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